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Thread: Hollow Ground vs. Flat Grind

  1. #1
    Spyderco Forum Registered User greencobra's Avatar
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    Hollow Ground vs. Flat Grind

    I've been thinking about this and wondering what the real reason is behind these two blade styles. We've had several polls here and flat grind rules. Correct me please, but both slice, push and pull cut, and chop. It's on small knives, Dragonfly I believe, and on big ones, Manix. I think the hollow ground is a better platform for a Spyder Edge serrated blade but what is the main reason and function differences between the two? I don't think in a poll, we,ve had less tham 3% touting the hollow ground virtues. Hmmm.

  2. #2
    Spyderco Forum Registered User i.v's Avatar
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    there's a great link running around here that explains everything, i'm sure someone will post it
    spyder fans seem to hunt for the flat grinds quite a bit, personally, i don't know, i have a delica with a saber flat grind, it cuts like a laser, i have a native, salt1 & cricket (which is the best cutter i have), all hollow ground, alll cut like lasers... i buy it because it's a spyderco, it works anyway

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    Spyderco Forum Registered User silverback's Avatar
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    Of course someone will post the link in question...

    You'll find the answer to your question in the blade geometry article by Joe Talmadge here:
    http://www.knifeart.com/knifearticles.html

    All other articles on this page are great, too.
    Few people think more than two or three times a year; I have made an international reputation for myself by thinking once or twice a week. -George Bernard Shaw

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  4. #4
    Spyderco Forum Registered User greencobra's Avatar
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    silverback, thanks for that link.

  5. #5
    Spyderco Forum Registered User ghostrider's Avatar
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    I believe JDEE goes into some depth on his website on this issue.
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  6. #6
    Spyderco Forum Registered User wotanson's Avatar
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    Hollow grind and Spyderedge for me, I know it makes me some what of a minority here now a days but hell, I can take it (especially when I know I'm right) Cheers, and Hail Odin
    HOW BOUT THEM RED SOX!!
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  7. #7
    Spyderco Forum Registered User JDEE's Avatar
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    Horses for Courses

    The debate on hollowground vs flat ground will continue on ad infinitum. There was a very good "debate" on the Dozier Forum many moons ago which gives insight into the pros and cons of both grounds plus the convex grind.

    Firstly, you should consider that it is easier to make a hollow ground blade than a flat ground blade but whether it is easier to make a good hollow ground blade than a good flat ground blade is another question. Many hollow ground blades on the market are not "true" HG's IMO - they are what I refer to as Sabre HG's in that the hollow grind starts at about half way of the width of the blade. A "true" HG IMV is similar to a cut throat razor (the design of the HG cut throat was such that if you laid the back of the blade on the stone this gave you the sharpening angle) and in much the same way as Bob Dozier makes his HG's.

    Secondly, both grinds have their advantages and disadvantages and the best way to work out what they are used for is to look at 2 blades that use the HG and FG - they are the cut throat razor and the chef's knife respectively. The cut throat is used for the push cut and the chefs knife for slicing. If you were to swap the grinds around then neither would work as well. So, it is not a matter of deciding what is the best grind it is a matter of deciding what is the best grind for what you want the knife for EG I like a small "true" HG for craft work on leather and wood and for a general purpose hunting/fishing/camping knife I prefer a FG blade.

    Whilst many "experts" say it is easier to sharpen a HG blade this may be so but it is not as easy to reprofile a HG blade esp., the Sabre type. To reprofile a FG blade no special equipment is needed whereas in many cases to reprofile a HG blade you need a belt sander with a large wheel. Another example of the differences in HG and FG and sharpening is carpenters chisels. A carpenter will have HG chisels for fine and delicate work and FG chisels for rough work and when it comes to sharpening for the FG chisels all that is needed is a flat bench stone but to do justice to the HG chisel a grinder with a wheel is required.

    To sum up it is not a matter of whether you like one of the other it is a matter of what grind suits your purposes for a particular blade.
    Jdee
    Have a Knife Day
    rusticforge.com/knives Australia

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