Taking apart knives - part 2

Discuss Spyderco's products and history.
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David Lowry
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Re: Taking apart knives - part 2

Postby David Lowry » Mon May 07, 2018 9:37 am

RamZar wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 10:48 am
David Lowry wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 7:37 am
Is there a part 1 since this thread is part 2? I'm at a loss here. Searched and couldn't find anything. Been away from the forum for a bit.
Here’s a link to part 1:
viewtopic.php?t=78032
Thank you very much my friend. ;)
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log man
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Re: Taking apart knives - part 2

Postby log man » Mon May 07, 2018 7:33 pm

Just as I have done with any 1911, these excellent knives are disassembled and dialed in before ever carrying a new Spyderco knife. First the spine edge which often has a course grind finish, so it gets smoothed and comfortable, as does the handle edges 360º, normally on a 3M EXL wheel. The clip is blasted to remove the black coating which scratches immediately and polished. The lock is examined and the spring bar tip where it contacts the lock bar is polished as is the spot on the lock bar it contacts to assure a smooth operation. The spring may be relaxed a slight amount to my liking as well. After this initial dialing in I reassemble and carefully center the blade in the closed position. It is then sharpened on my Wicked Edge until the bevel angles are the same on both sides and the dips and variations from being sharpened on a belt, is smoothed out and uniform. Then I smile and slip my new acquisition in my pocket and clip, perhaps draw, open and close, and re-pocket a few times to check it. Next morning it will slice my strawberries for my breakfast, Bravo! I do this to every brand I buy as well, and it simply assures me of the confidence I wish to have for each of them, as I now know them inside and out.

LOG

Spyderman91
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Re: Taking apart knives - part 2

Postby Spyderman91 » Sat Jun 16, 2018 5:47 pm

I have never taken a part any of my knives through all my years as a undercover knife enthusiast.

Now however, I am afraid I have to because the stop pin in my paramilitary 2 is rusting and it is now affecting the blade.
Makes me sad because the knife itself is only 3 months old and I thought it was more impervious than it actually is.
I've carried it almost everyday with regular rotations in between, didn't bushcraft with it and it mostly did household chores.
I cleaned it regularly, and would dry it down thoroughly with a microfiber cloth.

Since I am already breaking down the knife already... I figure might as well install some carbon fiber scales as well. I'll documents my progress with
pics in another upcoming thread. Have to wait on the refund for my Knifecenter Exclusive and then the swap job will commence.

steelcity16
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Re: Taking apart knives - part 2

Postby steelcity16 » Mon Jun 18, 2018 8:47 am

log man wrote:
Mon May 07, 2018 7:33 pm
Just as I have done with any 1911, these excellent knives are disassembled and dialed in before ever carrying a new Spyderco knife. First the spine edge which often has a course grind finish, so it gets smoothed and comfortable, as does the handle edges 360º, normally on a 3M EXL wheel. The clip is blasted to remove the black coating which scratches immediately and polished. The lock is examined and the spring bar tip where it contacts the lock bar is polished as is the spot on the lock bar it contacts to assure a smooth operation. The spring may be relaxed a slight amount to my liking as well. After this initial dialing in I reassemble and carefully center the blade in the closed position. It is then sharpened on my Wicked Edge until the bevel angles are the same on both sides and the dips and variations from being sharpened on a belt, is smoothed out and uniform. Then I smile and slip my new acquisition in my pocket and clip, perhaps draw, open and close, and re-pocket a few times to check it. Next morning it will slice my strawberries for my breakfast, Bravo! I do this to every brand I buy as well, and it simply assures me of the confidence I wish to have for each of them, as I now know them inside and out.

LOG

Yeah, I agree with the 1911 analogy. I would love to be able to field strip my knives easily for cleaning, customization, maintenance, lube, tuning, whatever. The two things that hinder this are typically the loctite on the screws and the flared lanyard tubes. I wish they would do away with those two things to allow easy tear down and rebuild. It would also be great to be able to purchase replacement screws for stripped or lost screws, and un-flared lanyard tubes to replace the flared ones on the knives I already own. I have a replacement lanyard tube I bought on eBay in my PM2 and I have no issues with it being un-flared. You can't tell the difference until you take it apart, which is a MUCH easier task now. I just would prefer to not have to spend $20 per lanyard tube for replacement ones.
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jackh
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Re: Taking apart knives - part 2

Postby jackh » Fri Jun 22, 2018 9:04 pm

Vivi wrote:
Tue Feb 27, 2018 5:50 pm
I can't believe people return knives they take apart. If I do anything other than take a knife out of the box, open and close it a few times, and rub my thumb over the edge to test it, it's mine. Anything else is incredibly disrespectful to every party involved in getting the product to me.

I've had knives that ended up being too small for me that looked big enough on paper. Those I trade or sell myself, I'd feel bad returning a knife for something like that even.

It's unfortunate there are those who feel differently.
I like your post, especially the part I highlighted. In my experience any Spyderco knife that lasts 30 days of normal use and is still working fine will last many years. The way I feel is if there is a defect in the knife it will fail very soon. I came up with this thinking because sometimes I will make new scales or otherwise mod the knife voiding the warranty. Over the years I've had a very few problems with very few Spyderco's and they have done nothing short of doing whatever necessary to fix the issue. Therefore have a great desire to be 100% honest with them and not try to return a knife (no matter where I bought it) that has a problem that either I caused or occurred after I knowingly voided the warranty.

Rest assured my desire to be 100% honest with Spyderco does not make me a nice guy. If a knife (or any product) company screws me over I would have no problem in being less than honest with them. I mention this as a testimony to Spyderco that their dedication to customers isn't going unrewarded. Also, the same message to other companies.

Tom S
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Re: Taking apart knives - part 2

Postby Tom S » Fri Jul 13, 2018 3:03 pm

When I buy a knife I first inspect if there are any issues. If so then it goes back to the retail seller in the original packaging. If I decide that I want to keep the knife then it is up to me to determine if I want to take apart and also if I want to modify. For example I have several Delicas in different steels. Some of them either do have, or will have, aftermarket scales which obviously means I'm committed to the knife. For me it's pretty cut and dry.... if the knife is defective I send it back. If not then I assume 100% responsibility of ownership including following the manufacturers requirements. Follow the rules and we will all be ok :)

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MichaelScott
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Re: Taking apart knives - part 2

Postby MichaelScott » Fri Jul 13, 2018 5:09 pm

It’s that “responsibility of ownership” thing that seems to be missing with some folks. We all have a choice.
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