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Thread: Sharpening Steels?

  1. #1
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    Question Sharpening Steels?

    Sharpening Steels. The reason I bring up the subject is that there are so many different ones on the market and there are those that do indeed actually abrade the steel to improve the edge and there are those that are said to only align an already well honed edge. Currently I have some of each variant along with a couple of ceramic models.

    One of my favorite makers of butcher/sharpening steels is the F. Dick Co. of Germany. Just about every meat cutter I've met and most of the people in the restuarant trade that I've gotten to know seem to use that brand of sharpening steel more than any other. Not at all saying that they are the only good one out there but I've yet to find one better than those made by Frederick Dick Company of Germany for my personal use.

    One of the F. Dick steels I have and use fairly often is the F. Dick "MULTICUT" model. It is oval/eliptical in shape and has 2 different sides to it. The one primary feature I like about the MULTICUT steel is that it does seem to actually abrade as well as burnish the edge of a knife. It seems to really help fixed blades for food prep. There are a lot of new sharpening steels on the market in the past 3 years. There are a lot of diamond impregnated steels and I'm seeing more and more high quality ceramic steels than I used to.

    So what is your favorite steel? Does your steel sharpen and/or abrade the blade? And please give us a name brand. I also have an F. Dick Poliron steel that is a super slick, super hard surface. All it does is to truly align the edge>> that is an edge that is already somewhat sharp to begin with.

    Also tell us if your sharpening steel is one you find to really help in the sharpening process?
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    Spyderco Forum Registered User kbuzbee's Avatar
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    Not a fan of steels in general. I find I seem to hurt rather than help my edge a majority of the time. Just technique (or lack thereof ). Currently the only "steel" still in the kitchen is a DMT ceramic. It is fairly fine but it does sharpen a bit. I think if I would spend some time I could become useful with it. F. Dick are certainly well regarded. I've never tried one.

    Ken
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbuzbee View Post
    Not a fan of steels in general. I find I seem to hurt rather than help my edge a majority of the time. Just technique (or lack thereof ). Currently the only "steel" still in the kitchen is a DMT ceramic. It is fairly fine but it does sharpen a bit. I think if I would spend some time I could become useful with it. F. Dick are certainly well regarded. I've never tried one.

    Ken
    I knew that DMT had diamond impregnated sharpening steels but I didn't know that they marketed one in ceramic. Albeit I have a conical shaped ceramic sharpening device for serrated edges I got from them about 6 years ago. There are so many more companies in the sharpening business than there used to be which is one reason I'm doing a thread on steels again.

    The F. Dick Multicut steel I have is oval/eliptical shaped and has 2 different sides to it. And like I said it actually hones the knife to a degree and does it nicely on big fixed blades in particular.

    I'll have to do some checking on DMT's product line soon. Thanks for the info Ken. >> JD
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    Spyderco Forum Registered User kbuzbee's Avatar
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    玉鋼

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    Quote Originally Posted by kbuzbee View Post
    Those conical diamond and ceramic files of DMT's that I have are excellent quality sharpening tools and I've had really good luck using them on really dinged u Spyderedges. I've been looking at many of their diamond benchstones here lately and I'm torn between them and "Atomas" that a few of the guys here seem to be high on.

    One reason I wanted to do a thread again on "sharpening steels" is because I've seen a lot of change in product lines in the past 10 years especially. And there are a lot of misconceptions about how they work as well. With a growing market of sharpening steels that actually do abrade and sharpen edged tools I do believe things are changing in that area of sharpening tools.

    I'll definitely take a hard look at their catalog and website this weekend. The 3M company has some great diamond sharpening tools and I'm also going to see if they have anything similar.
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    Spyderco Forum Registered User kbuzbee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JD Spydo View Post
    I've been looking at many of their diamond benchstones here lately and I'm torn between them and "Atomas" that a few of the guys here seem to be high on.
    I have both and prefer the uniformity of the Atomas. Much tighter scratch pattern. But that comes at a cost Of course, with either, you use VERY little pressure and just let the diamonds do the work.

    The only 3M products I've tried are the diamond films, but those are outstanding.

    Ken
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    Spyderco Forum Registered User Evil D's Avatar
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    It's no different to me than a barber using a leather strop. It's a tool used on purpose built and purpose sharpened blades that only cut specific things and so for those applications they're fine for use but I wouldn't use one for a pocket knife.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil D View Post
    It's no different to me than a barber using a leather strop. It's a tool used on purpose built and purpose sharpened blades that only cut specific things and so for those applications they're fine for use but I wouldn't use one for a pocket knife.
    I don't use mine on pocket knives much myself>> however this morning I was touching up and fine tuning my EDC C-60 Ayoob model and I did steel it on the smooth Poliron steel. The burnishing effect does seem to help VG-10 blades to some degree.

    I mainly use mine mostly on fixed blades and culinary/kitchen blades and they do seem to help them. I'm kind of wanting to know what some of these newer ones recently on the market are really benefitting anyone or not.

    Most of the meat cutters and chefs I've chatted with in the past 6 months or so still use them in their trades and again most of them I talk to use the F. Dick steels. The one big restuarant supply house we have here at north KC has the F. Dick and the Dexter Russell brands which I hear very little about. They do carry 2 diamond impregnated models >> one being made by F. Dick and another company called Ultimate Edge has about 4 to 5 models they sell commercially.

    With blade steels constantly changing it makes me wonder if the companies that make sharpening steels are also changing with the times?

    That F. Dick Poliron model for instance is about the hardest steel I've ever used. That thing is about as hard as tungsten carbide. But it really does a nice job of aligning an edge on a big food knife.
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