Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: Sharpening free hand. Lift handle/don't lift handle????

  1. #1
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687

    Sharpening free hand. Lift handle/don't lift handle????

    I've always heard lift the handle as you maintain the edge angle around the belly. Always heard that. But I never really thought about it until recently. In the past few months I've been working on free hand sharpening and Ken Schwartz says "Don't lift the handle, I don't really know where that idea came from". That's a pretty close quote. I watched one of his videos and tried to copy his technique. However, the one I watched was him on a belt sander and the point was to keep the edge perpindicular with the direction of the stroke. This will keep the scratch pattern perpindicular with the edge around the belly. So, I figured lifting the handle was just a wives tale or whatever. Then I read a really good thread on BF a week or two ago. Here it is. This is a really good read. I talked to this guy on the phone also. He has a lot to give on technique.

    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...rst+sharpening

    In this thread he states, and it immediately got my attention, that "you need to lift the handle" when going around the belly to maintain the correct angle. This is on post #130. The thread is about 8 pages long. It was started in 2010. So, two guys who IMO are top shelf sharpeners completely disagree in one part of the technique. Who knew something like that could ever happen? Think about this. Lifting the handle or not lifting the handle is a HUGE difference in stroke technique. So, I played with it and made a couple of videos. I tried to type it but felt I wasn't getting the point across. Come to find out you can lift the handle or not lift the handle. Both work but another part of the stroke is different. Till now I've been using the "don't lift handle" method. But the "lift handle" technique really felt good and I'm going to try using that technique. It seemed that no matter how high you lift your hand the angle is the same on the edge. The only difference is the portion of the blade you are removing steel from. Of course this technique would require practice but it SOUNDS like a solid technique. Well, since knifenut2013 does it this way I'm going to call it a proven technique for now. The videos are uploading to photobucket right now. I guess they are pretty big because it's taking time. I need to find a way to shrink the size of the videos taken with my camera. Gotta take a break and the videos are still uploading. I'll post them pretty soon so check back. This is really a revelation for me. Some of you may already know this (I'm sure) but some may not.


    Jack

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  2. #2
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687
    Here is the video of lifting the handle of the knife.


    Here is the video of NOT lifting the handle of the knife.


    I hope this made sense. I'm going to be playing with these two techniques to see which I like the best. I really feel good with the "don't lift" method right now but that's what I am used to. But the "lift handle" method felt so good right away I may change to that. That way felt like it was easier to maintain the angle and lifting the handle only changed the location on the edge that is getting sharpened. At first thought the angle (being one of the hardest things to control free hand) being made easier to control is a huge improvement in technique. The thing is both seem to work. I really like knowing the "why" both work and having the option of choosing. I don't know about anyone else, but I think this is a huge factor to grasp in free hand sharpening.

    Please, anyone with additional info on this issue please come on down! Oh yeah, if you haven't already seen it please read the thread I mentioned in post 1. After I read this thread I emailed him. Then I talked to him on the phone about a lot of sharpening stuff and when I hung up I called Ken Schwartz to discuss this lift hand thing. Ken gets into geometry and I have to make him explain or hang up. He explains willingly and I thank him for that because explaining to me can be umm, difficult. The way he explains it is the stone is a plane and the blade is a plane. Keeping the two planes at the same angle throughout the stroke is key.
    Last edited by jackknifeh; 01-10-2014 at 07:33 PM.

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  3. #3
    Spyderco Forum Registered User Minibear453's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    807
    I choose to lift the handle. And I"m not a great sharpener, most I get is just barely hair whittling, but I feel that it doesn't really matter as long as you do it consistently. If it's consistent, perhaps the degree will vary on the blade, but as long as the apex is properly formed... just my experiences.
    Carry a sharp knife, and life will never be dull

  4. #4
    Spyderco Forum Registered User _centurio_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Austria
    Posts
    99
    In my opinion the tecnique does not matter as long as you sharpen consistently. Grit doesn't matter that much for general purpose tasks as long as you minimize the burr at the end. F.e. I sharpened my Manix 2XL only with 120grit Lansky System. Shaves armhair in both directions, push cuts paracord and slices extremely aggressive.

  5. #5
    Spyderco Forum Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    36280
    Posts
    714
    I have been sharpening knlves with stones for at least fifty years and have never heard that mentioned before. I know you have to twist the knife slightly to maintain the correct angle from side to another. I always tell someone to use oil and watch that line of thick dirty oil because that will show you the angle.

  6. #6
    Spyderco Forum Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    36280
    Posts
    714
    If I had to say one way or the other I would say not to lift the nhandle. Also with Whatncliffe blades you must use push strokes or you will ruin the blade tip. Thats why I'm not too crazy about the Wharncliffe blade at all. It's too hard to keep the edge perfectly flat and not round the tip off

  7. #7
    Spyderco Forum Registered User The Deacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Upstate SC, USA
    Posts
    21,264
    Quote Originally Posted by RanCoWeAla View Post
    I have been sharpening knlves with stones for at least fifty years and have never heard that mentioned before. I know you have to twist the knife slightly to maintain the correct angle from side to another. I always tell someone to use oil and watch that line of thick dirty oil because that will show you the angle.
    About sixty years here, and I agree - you do whatever is necessary to maintain a constant angle between the edge and the stone. If the only way to do that on a particular knife is to "lift the handle" then I'd lift the handle, but I can't recall ever thinking about it. FWIW, I just sharpened a Stretch and it did not feel like I was lifting the handle.
    Paul
    My Personal Website ---- Beginners Guide to Spyderco Collecting ---- Kiwimania ---- Spydiewiki
    Dead horses beaten, sacred cows tipped, chimeras hunted when time permits.
    WTC # 1458 - 1504 - 1508 - Never Forget, Never Forgive!

  8. #8
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687
    This is or can turn into a very enlightening subject I think. There are two things that have hit home for me on the subject of lifting the handle or not lifting the handle. First and possibly most important is the fact that (in my reading and watching videos) I have never been taught ANY technique. NONE, not once. Until recently. I have recently been turned onto two specific techniques. They are in the two professional quality videos I posted. There is no "do what works", do whatever you prefer", or any of thos other ideologies that if comming from an instructor would be useless UNLESS the instructor is teaching both techniques. In this case doing whatever you prefer applies because there are two completely different techniques in question. Maybe the reason this hits me so hard is I am relatively new to free hand sharpening with high performance as a goal. People whith 50 years of experience have their technique down and they probably never even think about what they are doing. What they do is second nature like driving. I think we all know that being able to do something well and teaching how to do it or explain it is a completely different skill. When I was taught the "not lift handle" technique I practiced it and having been taught WHY to hold the knife a certain way and how to hold it and move it during a stroke I got pretty proficient at it and was getting bevels the same approximate width from heel to tip. The accuracy came faster than I expected and I believe it is because I was taught exactly what to do and the why of it. Knowing the why is as important as knowing the what to do IMO. So I had a specific technique and was improving fast. Then I read where another very experienced and skilled sharpener says "lift the handle". I talked to both people on the phone which is a lot more effective way to communicate than writing.

    On a side note I decided to lower the angle on my Manbug. To do this I set the bevel at 10 dps with the EP. Then I continued free hand. I wanted to do this free hand to test the "lift handle" technique. I went slow and tried to follow this technique as accurately as I could. I have to say I got GREAT results. I learned enought to explain this in a little more detail now. I may make a video later. But to get the angle I wanted I layed the edge on the stone and established and angle. The angle is maintained by NOT spinning the handle in your hand or in a small knife's case, fingers. I'm going to have to make a video. I'm picturing how hard this is to picture. But, it's SO SIMPLE. It's simplicity is what makes it so effective. The "don't lift handle" is a little more complicated but it's not rocket science. The important thing to know IMO is that I've gotten very specific instruction IN SOMETHING, ANYTHING instead of "do what feels best" or any other vague statement. Sometimes you guys with all the experience may not have been taught any more than my Dad taught me. Dad said, and showed me to stroke one side, stroke the other side, and when you form a burr on one side you are almost done. Then he showed me how to remove a burr and bam, I had a sharp pocket knife to cut myself with. I think that was his plan because after I cut my index finger to the bone a couple of weeks later, then he bought me a hatchet! Anyway, anyone learning free hand sharpening I think, like anything, the better you (we) are taught the faster we will become skilled. Of course there is still LOTS of practice we need to do but knowing where to start, IMO, will reduce the time it takes to improve. I'll try to get a couple more crappy videos to show what I learned today. Actually, the learning came in two steps. The first step was doing it. The second step was understanding what I was doing, why I was doing it, and also being able to explain what and why I'm doing it.

    I have not figured anyting out myself. I have learned what two other guys do and how it works and why. I'm trying to share what I have learned because I believe it would make so much difference when learning from scratch. I already had habits and needed to change them and will change some more I'm sure. Maybe one or two of my habits are acceptable (maybe). It's much easier to develope specific, good habits to start with. I hope this helps others as much as this info has helped me. Again, as much as I've read, gotten advice, watched youtube, etc. I don't remember any technique so well explained and specific as these two. AND, both techniques WORK. This truely is one of those situation that "do what you prefer" is accurate because whichever you choose works. Just like which Spyderco to buy when both are great choices.

    Jack

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  9. #9
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687
    I just got an email saying the "lift handle" is an old Japanese style of sharpening. So, when I said Ken didn't know where the idea came from may be inaccurate. He's heard of it but maybe doesn't do it because he developed his technique and since it works he likes it. I know I like it. So I'm writing a correction because when quoting someone else I don't want to get anything inaccurate. I don't mind me being wrong, but stating someone else's knowledge and being wrong is inaccusable IMO. So forgive me Ken if I mis-quoted you. And the rest of you just forget I said it. Thanks.

    After reprofiling two knives with the lift handle method I, by default, immediately switched to the other technique to refine the edge. It was like my hands switched by themselves due to muscle memory. I forced myself to refine the edge with the lift handle technique and it works. and works easily. Video of angle control comming in an hour or so.

    Jack

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  10. #10
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687
    Here is a video on how to adjust and maintain the bevel or edge angle from heel to tip using the lift handle method.

    So to work on the bevel you maintain the angle you choose and to work on the edge apex you just TWIST the knife until the apex is on the stone. That's the only difference in the stroke.

    Here is a video demonstrating using up and back strokes.
    Note: At the end of the video I mention refining the edge and only using push strokes. Watch how I TWIST the knife to change the angle so the edge apex is on the stone instead of the bevel only. I should have mentioned this in the video. AND, if you want a convex bevel instead of a bevel as flat as you can make it just TWIST the knife to change the angle as you are stroking up and back. Takes practice I'm finding like anything else.


    I can't say it's "easy" but either of these techniques at least gives the sharpener a specific goal in movement instead of just getting to work without any real idea of how to stroke the edge. When doing that, like I have done most of my life, it's like needing to reinvent the wheel all over starting from scratch. I'd rather start with a proven, round wheel and try to improve on that (if possible). Learning from someone else's experience means I don't need to make the same mistakes he/she did. That's how I look at it anyway. Speaking of that, my intention of this thread is to give you guys the source of info about this subject, NOT to "do what I do". The sources are Ken Schwartz (CKTG) and knifenut2013 on BF. The "first sharpening" thread is where to start for sharpening info from knifenut. Contact Mr. Schwartz on CKTG. Both know their stuff IMO and are eager to help. Or, learn your own style if you want. Nothing really wrong with that. These guys did I think and they have been sharpening for many years. I just don't have that many years left.

    Jack
    Last edited by jackknifeh; 01-12-2014 at 07:38 AM.

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  11. #11
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687
    Slight change of subject but since this is about sharpening strokes I'm going to include a picture of my stropping using trailing strokes. The issue in this pic is that I'm using only the weight of the blade on the strop. This is done (by me) by letting the handle just rest on my finger(s) and the blade edge just rest of the strop. This is pretty much the same as using push strokes on a stone but no pic of that. Also, you can reduce the amount of pressure (weight) on the strop by moving your fingers on the handle closer to the balance point of the knife. Notice I can do this quickly because I can let the handle rest on either of two fingers in the picture. I can change fingers during a single stroke if I want. Not the fourth finger. Except for playing guitar I find little use for the little guy.



    I seldom strop with pressure greater than the weight of the blade. Using proper technique on stones the edge is already sharp enough and refined enough to split the atom without stropping. But, once the edge is that sharp you can still refine it more with proper stropping. Then you can split the "half atom" you created when splitting it. That is if you didn't blow yourself up. This is my opinion and may (probably) differs from others.

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  12. #12
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687
    Here is a picture of a stone that started clean. I had sharpened a Dragonfly2 using the lift hand method. I don't know if this is beneficial or not. It just shows that there is a consistancy with this method. It doesn't show that any consistant angle has been maintained. Also, I think this pattern is only made when sharpening a knife with a blade length shorter than the width of the blade. With blades longer than the width of the stone you need to move your handle hand farther away from the side of the stone and the area of the stone being contacted with the edge could be anywhere on the surface. While the edge is being effect the same the marks on the stone could be anywhere and not indicate a consistancy like these marks do. This stone is 2 3/4" wide. All this really shows is a repeatable pattern of the stroking. The dark areas are where the edge contacted the stone. When I lifted my hand the marks go towards the center of the stone as I round the belly. You can also see marks from when I don't lift my hand. This leaves the heel end of the edge on the stone and is shown by the dark areas up the entire length of the stone on the sides. Consistantly repeating the stroke motion is needed to create an angle or edge accurately as well as as quickly as possible. The only reason I feel this may help is because I haven't noticed anything this consistant before. I will clean the stone and repeat this using the "don't lift hand" method and see if there is any difference.



    This whole issue may only be meaningful to me but having a strict plan of my stroke motion is helping me get better results (I think ). Like most techniques when starting with a basic, known movement you can then deviate a basic movement due to the conditions of the edge you are working on at the time.

    Jack

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  13. #13
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687
    Here are a couple of pictures of an edge I profiled last night using the "lift handle" method. I used Shapton glass stones 320, 1k and 4k stones. I may polish it more with the 8k. I'm getting more comfortable with this stroke method and my bevels are getting flatter (some) and the bevels are staying closer to the same width along the edge. Gotta go, need more practice. Maybe I will take a break to eat something.

    This knife is a Darabonne #53. Great knife with M4 steel and G-10 handle scales. Liner lock. Made by a forum friend and gifted to me out of the kindness of his heart. Thank you forum friend. I put the "sharpening notch" on the knife. It being huge I use it for stripping electrical wire and such. Also, being sharp when string or small rope fall in there I pull and it's cut. Kind of a cool little feature. Not really WORTH the amount of work it took though.


    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  14. #14
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687
    Quote Originally Posted by The Deacon View Post
    About sixty years here, and I agree - you do whatever is necessary to maintain a constant angle between the edge and the stone. If the only way to do that on a particular knife is to "lift the handle" then I'd lift the handle, but I can't recall ever thinking about it. FWIW, I just sharpened a Stretch and it did not feel like I was lifting the handle.
    I think Paul hits on a key issue that I thought of as I heard of these two methods compared to what I have been doing all my life. Paul has 60 years of experience. I'd bet one dollar and twenty five cents (of someone else's money ) that he gets his edges REALLY sharp by doing whatever he does regarding stroke. But based on his last sentence I don't get the feeling he learned a specific method or technique. If I'm wrong Paul please correct me. It's just that based on your post, I'm using it as an example of how we learn all sorts of things in life and become skilled because of repetition. But you just sharpened a knife. You state that you "did not feel" like you were lifting the handle. I'd think that means your stroke has been developed over years of experience and you do it without even thinking about technique or anything. For you to suddenly change to something completely different would be unnecessary. But for people first starting out it seems to me that developing the basic stroke and knowing why to move the blade a certain way or hold the knife a specific way would speed up the great results. Just my way of looking at it I suppose. I also want to emphasize I am repeating what I am learning and I am NOT a teacher or the pro to listen to. If anyone wants to know more their best bet would be to contact the guys who I got my info from.

    Jack

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  15. #15
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687
    Quote Originally Posted by RanCoWeAla View Post
    If I had to say one way or the other I would say not to lift the nhandle. Also with Whatncliffe blades you must use push strokes or you will ruin the blade tip. Thats why I'm not too crazy about the Wharncliffe blade at all. It's too hard to keep the edge perfectly flat and not round the tip off
    Key point here. Lifting the handle or however you do it is for GOING AROUND THE BELLY TO THE TIP. With a wharncliff blade you don't lift the handle or anything. Lock your wrist at whatever angle you choose and just go back and forth until the bevels are the same from heel to tip. After use and touch ups I'm thinking the tip will become rounded just a bit over time. This may be because the tip area may get duller sooner because it's used more. For a touch up you just spend a couple of minutes sharpening that section. But for a wharncliff I guess you need to lay the entire edge on the stone and remove steel from the entire edge even if the heel and/or middle of the edge is still very sharp.

    I'm thinking this only. I've never used and maintainded a wharncliff blade knife.

    Jack

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  16. #16
    Spyderco Forum Registered User yablanowitz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Liberal, Kansas
    Posts
    4,272
    Wharncliffe and sheepsfoot blades tend to get rounded off at the tip for several reasons. One is that the very tip gets used a lot, so it wears a lot. Another is that the very tip often contacts underlying harder materials when cutting, resulting in damage. Perhaps the largest reason is the thinking that "only the tip is dull, so I'll just sharpen the tip". As wasteful as it seems, if you want the edge to remain straight, you have to sharpen the entire edge. The sheepsfoot blades on my stockman knives usually wear twice as fast as the clip and spey blades.

    As for lifting the handle or sweeping the tip to follow the curve of the blade, either will work, but I find I get more consistent angle control when I lift the handle. I tend to lower the spine when I sweep the tip forward, resulting in a lower angle around the belly and tip. It makes that part of the blade (which is the part I use the most) a bit sharper, but also less durable.
    I don't believe in safe queens, only in pre-need replacements.

  17. #17
    Spyderco Forum Registered User razorsharp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    2,809
    Do what feels natural, I lift the handle, used to do a combo of both.



    http://instagram.com/p/kOg1D7R6xs/
    http://instagram.com/p/iiESSBx6yh/
    I wouldn't say these edges are wrong cause I didn't lift the handle
    -Travis
    Come chat with us on IRC

    Visit the knife picture site http://sharpthings.net/
    Super-steel Nut

    To the sharpening junkies: SHOW THOSE EDGES!
    Spyderco Knives- Tuff- Southard- Resilience
    Others- Dalibor Sirius- Strider SnG DGG- Ozark Tradition DC Slicer- Curtiss Nano- Strider SMF Lego
    Inbound: Zero Tolerance 0777 - Zero Tolerance 0801cf - Benchmade 940-1

  18. #18
    Spyderco Forum Registered User Clip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Forest, VA
    Posts
    1,546
    I'll lift the handle slightly because it feels natural, but seems to me that you would need to adjust somehow (especially for trailing points like the South Fork) because the contact point of the blade/stone moves in respect to the long axis of the knife. In my head I picture not compensating/lifting the handle will result in a wider bevel at the tip.

    That said, I'll do whatever I can to get edges like Travis Mine usually come out sharp enough, but convex and slightly uneven.
    Click here to zoom: Under the Microscope

    Manix2, Elmax MT13, M4 Manix2, ZDP Caly3, ZDP Caly Jr, SB Caly3.5, M390 Para2, Cruwear MT12, Techno, XHP MT16, South Fork, SB Caly3, Manix2 Ltwt, Salt I, 20CP Para2, Military Left Hand, Perrin PPT, Forum Native5, Squeak, Manix 83mm, 440V Military, Gayle Bradley, Swick3, Lil' Temperance, Cruwear Military, VG10 Jester, Terzuola SlipIt, XHP Native Ltwt, Domino, CPM154/S90V Para2, SB Stretch, D2 Para, Dfly2 Salt, Tasman Salt

    Chris

  19. #19
    Spyderco Forum Registered User razorsharp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    2,809
    Quote Originally Posted by Clip View Post
    I'll lift the handle slightly because it feels natural, but seems to me that you would need to adjust somehow (especially for trailing points like the South Fork) because the contact point of the blade/stone moves in respect to the long axis of the knife. In my head I picture not compensating/lifting the handle will result in a wider bevel at the tip.

    That said, I'll do whatever I can to get edges like Travis Mine usually come out sharp enough, but convex and slightly uneven.
    It has made bigger bevels at the tip nearly every time I have done it without lifting the handle, though sometimes I want that
    -Travis
    Come chat with us on IRC

    Visit the knife picture site http://sharpthings.net/
    Super-steel Nut

    To the sharpening junkies: SHOW THOSE EDGES!
    Spyderco Knives- Tuff- Southard- Resilience
    Others- Dalibor Sirius- Strider SnG DGG- Ozark Tradition DC Slicer- Curtiss Nano- Strider SMF Lego
    Inbound: Zero Tolerance 0777 - Zero Tolerance 0801cf - Benchmade 940-1

  20. #20
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,687
    Quote Originally Posted by yablanowitz View Post

    As for lifting the handle or sweeping the tip to follow the curve of the blade, either will work, but I find I get more consistent angle control when I lift the handle. [/B]I tend to lower the spine when I sweep the tip forward, resulting in a lower angle around the belly and tip.[N] It makes that part of the blade (which is the part I use the most) a bit sharper, but also less durable.
    I had the same issue. As you said both methods work but by lifting the handle to go around the belly to the tip the only change is you lift the handle straight up. The only thing that you can do wrong is not lift enough or lift too much. Both of these errors are easy to correct. Just look at the bevel at the tip and you can see when you didn't lift enough. The scratch pattern (new one) just doesn't reach the tip. If you go too far you will be rounding the pointy tip.

    To be honest I feel bad for anyone who has a problem maintaining a consistent angle and knows it and doesn't try this technique. It makes the whole process of free hand sharpening SO MUCH EASIER than anything else I've tried. It doesn't take as much practice to get better. It does take a bit of practice though. Then again, so does the EP. Everything takes practice. We will still never get the angle consistency as the EP, WE, etc. gives you but this free hand technique makes it easier because of the fewer changes in your hand position during one stroke. For a basic stroke on a basic knife with a basic edge shape the only change is lifting the handle up and lowering it back down as you stroke the edge up and down the stone. That's it! That's all there is to it!!!. The things that will add to this simple task is longer blades, differently shaped blades (recurves, etc.) or probably any number of things specific to any given knife. But once the basic stroke is learned small changes needed for out of the ordinary blades can be made. This was like a revelation to me. Hope it helps others. But as many say, "whatever works, do that". Just ask yourself how well what you are doing is working.

    Jack

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •