Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 26 of 26

Thread: Spyderco medium grit bench stone. Opinions please.

  1. #21
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,712
    Quote Originally Posted by sir_mike View Post
    So are you gonna get a Spyderco medium bench stone or something different? Or still undecided?

    I watch this thread as I am thinking about the freehanding and the Spyderco benchstone set!
    I've decided not to get the Spyderco med. stone. The DMT stones I have cover the need the med. ceramic stone would also cover. If you are thinking of the set of Spyderco stones I highly recommend the fine and UF grits. Based on the other posts the med. would be a good choice as well but for any time you want to reprofile an edge or a knife is really dull a fine or coarse grit DMT would be nice. The price isn't too bad on cutleryshoppe.com. Down right pleasant prices if you can live with the 2x6" stones. Right now I'm living with a coarse and extra coarse DMT stone in the 2x6" size because I don't use those grits very often. I also get the feeling there may not be a big difference in the med and fine Spyderco grits from this thread. I prefer a set of stones that have just a little difference in how coarse or fine they are. This makes the stone progression much easier. When you skip a couple of grit choices you end up with a lot of work with each stone. So the med. and fine grit Spyderco stones is a good start and then decide if you want the UF stone and also if you want coarser stones. The fine Spyderco stone leaves a GREAT very sharp edge. Not knowing your sharpening experience I'll say this. To get the benifits the UF stone is capable of it requires a little more skill. The UF stone is a great tool though. I love it.

    Jack

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  2. #22
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,712
    To deal with my random scratch issue for now I will pay more attention to NOT using a lot of pressure when using the coarser grit stones. I have developed a habit of using extremely light strokes on the last 2 or 3 stones but with the stones I remove a lot of steel with while re-profiling I may have been using too much force. Hopefully using lighter strokes will result in fewer deeper scratches than the grit should leave. Just a thought. Using extremely light pressure has proven to be the key in the ultra sharp edges I'm now getting using only stones. Maybe extremely light pressure with the coarser grits will show good results regarding deep scratches.

    Jack

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

  3. #23
    Spyderco Forum Registered User Donut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA, USA
    Posts
    6,526
    I think the scratches are due to the fact that you can't get all of the diamonds to line up. It's similar to having sand drop on fly paper and wanting it to be an even surface.
    -Brian
    A distinguished lurker.
    Chat with us. Sharpthings - A Blog Site

  4. #24
    Spyderco Forum Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    179
    Quote Originally Posted by jackknifeh View Post
    I also get the feeling there may not be a big difference in the med and fine Spyderco grits from this thread. Jack
    Owning the medium and fine (and ultra fine) Spyderco bench stones I'll say that there is a significant difference between them. I don't know that I'd use the medium to do a reprofile since I'm not that patient, but it is good for removing damaged edges and resetting bevels.

    My DMT stones have seen quite a bit of use and I'm not as gentle with them as I ought to be, so the diamonds tend to get knocked out of the immediate margin of the edges. The middles of the DMT stones have been holding up pretty well despite my heavy handed technique.
    Last edited by Fancier; 10-22-2013 at 01:48 PM. Reason: clarity added

  5. #25
    Spyderco Forum Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    533
    My freehand sharpening skills are really non existent as I just as I just started to freehand. I will have to think about the Spyderco's then. I like the idea of using the stones dry and not ones with oil or water as I dont want the mess! I am really more interested in maintaining an edge as my knives dont see much use so just for touchups and if one gets dull from alot of use (just in case) scenario!

    I was thinking about the Wash Board setup with sandpaper! Anyone own one?



    Quote Originally Posted by jackknifeh View Post
    I've decided not to get the Spyderco med. stone. The DMT stones I have cover the need the med. ceramic stone would also cover. If you are thinking of the set of Spyderco stones I highly recommend the fine and UF grits. Based on the other posts the med. would be a good choice as well but for any time you want to reprofile an edge or a knife is really dull a fine or coarse grit DMT would be nice. The price isn't too bad on cutleryshoppe.com. Down right pleasant prices if you can live with the 2x6" stones. Right now I'm living with a coarse and extra coarse DMT stone in the 2x6" size because I don't use those grits very often. I also get the feeling there may not be a big difference in the med and fine Spyderco grits from this thread. I prefer a set of stones that have just a little difference in how coarse or fine they are. This makes the stone progression much easier. When you skip a couple of grit choices you end up with a lot of work with each stone. So the med. and fine grit Spyderco stones is a good start and then decide if you want the UF stone and also if you want coarser stones. The fine Spyderco stone leaves a GREAT very sharp edge. Not knowing your sharpening experience I'll say this. To get the benifits the UF stone is capable of it requires a little more skill. The UF stone is a great tool though. I love it.

    Jack

  6. #26
    Spyderco Forum Registered User jackknifeh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Florida panhandle
    Posts
    7,712
    Quote Originally Posted by sir_mike View Post
    My freehand sharpening skills are really non existent as I just as I just started to freehand. I will have to think about the Spyderco's then. I like the idea of using the stones dry and not ones with oil or water as I dont want the mess! I am really more interested in maintaining an edge as my knives dont see much use so just for touchups and if one gets dull from alot of use (just in case) scenario!

    I was thinking about the Wash Board setup with sandpaper! Anyone own one?
    My Dad taught me how to sharpen a knife when I was around 10 years old. Then until about 6 years ago I only owned two stones. Arkansas medium and fine grits. I could get a great edge using the medium stone. Then when I'd try to refine it with the fine stone it either wouldn't change or I would make the knife duller. Now I know it's because my ability to hold a consistant angle on the stone was very poor. But at the time I just quit using the fine grit stone. I'd try it once a year or so but after failing again I'd not try it any more for a while. So starting there and paying attention to how my ability has changed over the past few years I'm finding to get any benifit from the finer grit stones two things are needed. First the edge needs to already be sharp enough for the next finer grit to help the edge. Second, the ability to hold the edge at a consistant angle needs to be adequate. I think the Spyderco med stone and the fine grit stone might be similar to the Arkansas med and fine grits I had years ago. If you get the med and fine grits start with the medium grit and get the edge sharp. Then try the fine grit. If you dull the edge keep practicing with the medium grit but try the fine grit every couple of days. Use very slow strokes and focus on keeping the blade at the same angle. Doesn't matter what the angle is, just keep it as close to the same as you can. The ability to maintain a pretty consistant angle will come and it won't take a long time. Don't expect overnight improvement but after a couple of weeks or a month I bet your edges will be improved by the fine grit stone. Six months later you could try the UF grit stone if you want. I don't have a medium stone but I believe the Spyderco medium and fine grit are the perfect stones to start AND FINISH with. The only reason to get stones coarser stones is if you need to sharpen really dull knives or reprofile some. Finer grits are only necessary if you need or just want your edges to be smoother (less toothy). I believe more of a need for most people is to get another coarser stone befor anyone really NEEDS a finer grit stone than the Spyderco fine grit stone. What I'm saying is if you want to learn free hand sharpening I can't think of a better pair of stones to start with at any price. Plus, I too love the fact you can pull them out, use them and put them away with no mess. You need to wash them fairly often but that's at the sink and it onlyl takes a minute and the mess goes down the drain. Hope this made sense and it's only my opiniion which is based on a very limited experience with lots of different stones.

    Jack

    My EDC for a while. Stretch with carbon fiber handle, Chaparral 2, Dragonfly 2 with kirinite MOP handle, Manbug with bolster/red bone handle. Super blue/420J1 blades on all three (except Chaparral).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •