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Blade Grinds

CENTERLINE GRIND A blade grind resembling that of a double-edged knife in which the top and bottom bevels meet in the center of the blade's width. Only the bottom edge is sharpened and the spine of the knife is left unsharpened to create a swedge.  

FALSE EDGE A sharpened secondary edge on the spine of a blade near the point. If unsharpened, it is called a swedge.  

FLAT SABER GRIND A blade ground with flat bevels that extend from the centerline of the blade to the cutting edge. This grind maintains full thickness through a larger portion of the blade for increased strength.

FULL-FLAT GRIND A blade ground with flat bevels that extend from the spine all the way to the cutting edge. This grind reduces drag during cutting and decreases overall weight.

HAMAGURI Japanese for "clam" or "clamshell," it describes a blade ground with convex radiused bevels. Also called an Appleseed or Moran grind, it is often produced by grinding on a slack grinding belt.

HOLLOW GRIND A blade with bevels that are ground with a concave radius. The bevels may extend the full width of the blade (full hollow grind) or only a portion of its width.

SINGLE-BEVEL GRIND Also called a chisel grind, this describes a blade that is beveled on only one side. It may be flat or hollow ground.

SWEDGE An unsharpened bevel on the spine of a blade near the point. If it were sharpened it would be considered a false edge. A swedge reduces blade weight, enhances balance, and improves penetration.  

ZERO GRIND A grind similar to a full-flat grind but without the secondary bevel at the cutting edge. The plane of the bevel continues to create the cutting edge.

ZERO SABER GRIND (Scandinavian or "Scandi" grind) Similar to a flat-ground saber, but without a secondary bevel at the cutting edge. The plane of the bevel continues to create the cutting edge.